Research

Tech and Health: Innovative Devices Aren't Science Fiction
From nanomotors to customized prosthetics, check out inventions developed by Cockrell School engineers to provide better health care options in the future.
Lifelike Heart Valve Model Will Aid Treatment
Michael Sacks is developing mitral valve models that will enable heart surgeons to test solutions before they enter the operating room.
In Celebration of the Class of 2014
There is no more uplifting event in the life of UT than Commencement, honoring graduates' triumphant accomplishments. Meet four seniors who represent why we're so proud of the Class of 2014.
The Hard, Expensive — and Exciting Work of Developing a New Drug
Meet faculty members who are hard at work to make sure life-saving drugs get from the lab to the patients who need them most.
Back with a Vengeance: The Trouble with Defeating Diseases
Resistant bacteria, complex infections, latent viruses. UT researchers are joining forces to fight against infectious disease, and they're moving the needle.
Know - Your connection to a world of ideas
From nanomotors to customized prosthetics, check out inventions developed by Cockrell School engineers to provide better health care options in the future.
Michael Sacks is developing mitral valve models that will enable heart surgeons to test solutions before they enter the operating room.
There is no more uplifting event in the life of UT than Commencement, honoring graduates' triumphant accomplishments. Meet four seniors who represent why we're so proud of the Class of 2014.
Meet faculty members who are hard at work to make sure life-saving drugs get from the lab to the patients who need them most.
Resistant bacteria, complex infections, latent viruses. UT researchers are joining forces to fight against infectious disease, and they're moving the needle.

Recovery Act

The University of Texas at Austin has received $129 million for research through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Research investment includes major pieces of instrumentation, investigations in health, energy, infrastructure and other areas, and expanding supercomputing capabilties.

Read more about the university's research through federal economic Recovery Act funds.

Further Findings Research Blog

Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics helped develop a blueprint for a possible future NASA lander mission to Europa, an icy moon of Jupiter that has a global ocean covered by an ice shell.

Europa’s large reservoir of liquid water has long enchanted planetary scientists with the possibility of harboring life. Many experts believe it to be the most likely place in our solar system besides Earth to...

Researchers from the undergraduate level to the Nobel Prize explore, discover and innovate in the arts, humanities and sciences and across disciplinary boundaries. The impact of the university's research ripples through Texas and around the world.

Research Facts

Todd Ditmire and the Petawatt Laser$1.1 billion was awarded in sponsored research over the past two years.

$40 million over the past two years in revenue from the licensing of university technology.

The university runs one of the world's fastest supercomputers and one of the most powerful lasers.

Texas researchers were quickly on-site after the Haiti earthquake and Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

About 800 patents have been awarded to the university.

The university's 17 libraries hold more than nine million volumes.

The Harry Ransom Center displays a Gutenberg bible and the world's first photo.

Quetzalcoatlus, the largest flying creature ever discovered, was found by a university student. A replica is on display at the Texas Memorial Museum.

Research News

Published: July 16

Neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.

The scientists accomplished this feat by inserting a modified human alcohol target into the worms, as reported this week in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Published: July 2

Researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have created a new nonlinear metasurface, or meta mirror, that could one day enable the miniaturization of laser systems.

The invention, called a “nonlinear mirror” by the researchers, could help advance nonlinear laser systems that are used for chemical sensing, explosives detection, biomedical research and potentially many other applications. The researchers’ study will be published in the July 3 issue of Nature.

Published: June 30

MAGIS Device (magnetically activated and guided isotope separation). Click on the image to view an animation of the MAGIS device in action and to read more about how it works. Animation by Marianna Grenadier.

Futurity.org

Research news from The University of Texas at Austin and other leading universities.